Lisa Baraitser: ‘On Time, Care and Not Moving On’ at ICI Berlin, 5th July 2018

Lisa will be giving this lecture at 19.30, 5th July, 2018 at the ICI Berlin.  (And it is now available to watch here …)

Taking up the themes of her recent book Enduring Time, this talk will offer some reflections on the relations between time and care. Care is often assumed to be a set of practices that take the form of an affective engagement with others, so that we can maintain, sustain, and repair the world. Yet care can also be thought about as a political and ethical decision to remain in what Christina Sharpe calls ‘the wake’: the ongoing disastrous time of the persistent effects of slavery. Remaining, for Sharpe, involves inhabiting and rupturing the wake’s elongated temporality. From this perspective, Baraitser will argue that care is bound up with histories of the antithesis of care, or failures of care, that bring on ways of thinking that we may also need to take care of and involve the temporal practices of staying alongside others and ideas when care has failed; waiting, staying, delaying, enduring, repeating, and returning as the temporal forms that care takes.  Some psychoanalytic resources will help to think about the chronic and interminable, and the repetitive and developmental, in order to better understand the intersections between time, care, and not moving on.

For more details and booking info, visit the ICI Berlin site.

Transitional States: Hormones at the Crossroads of Art and Science

Team member Elena has been involved in putting together this exhibition at the Peltz Gallery at the School of Arts at Birkbeck which opened today and runs until 11th June.

Here’s a short description:

What effect do hormone uses have on emotions, sensations, sexual expression and desire? This video art exhibition presents the work of 14 artists and collectives who explore the immense role hormones have on our everyday life.

For more info, visit the exhibition site or the Birkbeck blog

Grey Time: Waiting for Beckett, 22-23 May 2018, University of Oslo

Our Exeter PI, Laura will be giving a paper on waiting and ‘grey time’ in Beckett at the Grey on Grey Conference at the University of Oslo, 22-23 May 2018.

Abstract:

There is a well-known story that when Beckett got to see the colour footage of his television play Quad played back on a black and white monitor he insisted it was ‘marvellous, […] 100,000 years later’. Beckett went on to record a monochrome, slowed down version of the play, Quadrat II, to sit alongside alongside the surprisingly colourful, rhythmic jerks and swerves of Quadrat I; together these snapshots of life represent an asymptotic stretching of time, a shuffling on and off towards a final still state. This seems like a typical move from the Beckett who insisted on policing the greyscale of his drama. ‘Too much colour’, he told the actor Billie Whitelaw, over and over, as she rehearsed Footfalls. Grey, or ‘Light black. From pole to pole’, is of course everywhere in Beckett’s later work, but although there has been some significant research on Beckett’s relationship to and with colour, the grey so firmly associated with Beckett’s aesthetic – from the tableaux of the plays to his iconic personal
image — has less frequently been linked to the author’s particular interest in the temporality of waiting. This paper sets out to determine what might be meant by ‘grey time’ in Beckett’s work. It traces out a time that is resolutely not a twilight or the famous l’heure bleue stretch of gloaming between night and day; it is rather, I argue, a historically specific, postwar articulation of temporality in which waiting is denuded of its ‘for’ – its purpose, its project, its
‘colour’. By showing how and why certain aspects of grey time speak clearly to Beckett’s ashen historical period, I also want to suggest which parts of Beckett’s temporality remain, lingering and enduring within our current waiting times.

For full details on the conference, including a list of speakers and their abstracts, visit Gray on Gray at the UiO: Department of Philosophy, Classics, History of Art and and Ideas webpage.

CFP for the Accelerated Academy

The Accelerated Academy have issued a CFP for their upcoming conference on temporality in May this year.  Here are the details or visit their website.

Academic Timescapes: Perspectives, Reflections, Responsibilities
May 24-25, 2018, Villa Lanna, Prague, Czech Academy of Sciences

Keynote lecture: Barbara Adam (Cardiff)

After meetings in Prague, Warwick and Leiden, the fourth Accelerated Academy conference calls for a more nuanced perspective in order to advance our understanding of academic temporalities as experienced, understood, controlled, managed, imagined and contested across different institutional contexts. The question of temporality – the human perception and social organization of time – in and of the academy has been attracting considerable attention across the social sciences in recent decades. Notable accounts have demonstrated that time is an important research object potentially offering new insights into the complex and shifting nature of the contemporary academy and its future. Existing studies tend to stress how pressures intrinsic to the imperatives of the knowledge economy and academic/epistemic capitalism co-shape policies and subsequently impact how time is perceived and experienced on the level of individuals and institutions, leading to concerns over their temporal relation to wider society. Taking the cue from the long tradition of sociology of time the conference aims to tackle various pressing question in the emerging field of the social studies of academic time. The conference will address the following themes but the organizers welcome other cognate problematics:

  • Theorizations and different disciplinary takes on temporality in academia
  • (Possible) methods of inquiring into academic temporalities
  • Temporal design(s), temporal policies
  • Temporal justice vs/and temporal autonomy
  • The promises and limits of ‘the slow’ in academia
  • Temporalities in/of teaching; temporalities in/of research – tensions, complementarities, (in)compatibilities
  • Temporal interfaces with wider society and its implications for science communication
  • Temporality of science communication via social media
  • Digitalization, temporal intersections and emerging temporalities in academia
  • Temporality, metrics, evaluations

Please submit short abstract (250 words) and bio to vostal@flu.cas.cz by 28 February 2018.

Organized by Centre for Science, Technology, and Society Studies, Institute of Philosophy of the Czech Academy of Sciences & University of Minho, Research Centre on Communication Studies (CECS).

Funded by Czech Science Foundation, Czech Academy of Sciences (Strategie AV21) & Portuguese Science Foundation, CECS, University of Minho.

Scientific Committee: Emília Araújo (University of Minho), Jana Bacevic (Cambridge University), Libor Benda (Czech Academy of Sciences), Mark Carrigan (Cambridge University), Björn Hammarfelt (University of Borås), Milena Kremakova (Humboldt University), Sarah de Rijcke (Leiden University), Tereza Stöckelová (Czech Academy of Sciences), Tereza Virtová (Czech Academy of Sciences), Filip Vostal (Czech Academy of Sciences)