NHS 70th Birthday Bash, Exeter Library Castle St.

You’re invited to a very special birthday party – Saturday, 30thJune 1-3pm at Exeter Central Library, Castle Street (click here for map)

The National Health Service is 70 this year. To celebrate, the Wellcome Trust-funded Waiting Times team and the Wellcome Centre for Cultures and Environments of Health are collaborating with colleagues at the Exeter Library and University of Warwick to organise a birthday party.

This will be no ordinary do, however. As part of our public engagement strategy, we will be organising a host of activities to mark the occasion, to explore the history and future of the NHS, and to collect memories and narratives of service use (and waiting) over the past 70 years. Stalls for the public will include:

  • Card-making – create everything from birthday to “get well soon” cards
  • Video reel – marking 70 years of the NHS on and through film
  • A consultation room – diagnose the NHS, prescribe it treatment, and prognosticate on its future
  • Message recording – leave a message for the NHS or record a memory for our archives
  • A waiting room and buffet area – like a GP waiting room, only with birthday cake, crisps, squash and token carrot sticks.
  • Creative-writing workshop – with the possibility of getting your story/poem published in Riptide new-writing journal
  • Children’s story-time – a medicine-themed story read by Library staff.

It will be fun for all the family and finished in time for the football too!

If you are interested in volunteering, or hearing more about the event, then please email:

martin.moore@exeter.ac.uk and m.flexer@exeter.ac.uk

We are particularly keen to hear from anyone else who is turning or has turned 70 in 2018.  We’d love to celebrate your birthday at the same time!

The Social Life of Time, 5-7th June, Edinburgh

In collaboration with the Temporal Belongings network, we’ll be holding our inaugural conference in Edinburgh, on 5th-7th June 2018.

The aim of this conference is to share current research on the social nature of time and to collaboratively reflect on key issues, problems and methodological approaches. In keeping with previous Temporal Belongings events, we will include a mixture of presentation styles, and plenty of time for discussion. We are particularly interested in playing with the traditional time of the academic conference and will include collaborative, participant-driven sessions where themes emerging from the presentations can be synthesised and explored in greater depth.  

Keynote speakers for the conference are:

Please send any queries to temporalbelongings@gmail.com

Michelle Bastian
Lisa Baraitser
Andrew Hom
Laura Salisbury
Conference Committee

For programme details and to book, please visit the conference website.

Enduring Time book launch 15th March

Enduring Time by Lisa Baraitser
Book launch and panel discussion

19.00-20.30
Thursday 15th March

Swedenborg House
20-21 Bloomsbury Way
London
WC1A 2TH

Celebrating the publication of Lisa Baraitser’s Enduring time, a panel of scholars (Laura Salisbury, Stella Sandford and Raluca Soreanu) will engage with the book to consider the changing ways we imagine and experience time. Climate change, unending violent conflict, fraying material infrastructures, permanent debt and widening social inequalities mean that we no longer live with an expectation of a progressive future, a generative past, or a flourishing now that characterized the temporal imaginaries of the post-war period. Time, it appears, is not flowing, but has become stuck, intensely felt, yet radically suspended. The question the book raises is how we might now ‘take care’ of time? How can we understand change as requiring time not passing? What can quotidian experiences of suspended time – waiting, delaying, staying, remaining, enduring, returning and repeating – tell us about the survival of social bonds? And how might we re-establish the idea that time might be something we both have and share, as opposed to something we are always running out of?

Praise for the book

This work is a tour de force. It constitutes the most significant rethinking of “women’s time” since Kristeva’s influential article. [ …] It brings philosophy, psychoanalysis, cultural theory, feminism and race theory, art and art criticism, together with trenchant social critique, philosophical meditation, and psychoanalytic inquiry in a brilliant and capacious way. Without any recourse to essentialism, Baraitser shows us for the first time the temporal world of care, of maintenance, their nonproductive and nonteleological potentials in an ethics that illuminates our world as one of time-consuming practices of staying with and for one another in the midst of destruction and repair (Judith Butler, UC Berkeley).

The panel discussion will be followed by a wine reception.