The Power of Sequential Narrative w/ Sarah Lippett and Lucy Sullivan

Saturday, 30 November, 3:30 – 6:30pm, Women’s Art Library (WAL), Goldsmiths University Library

Join graphic novelists Sarah Lippett and Lucy Sullivan for an afternoon of discussion on the power of sequential narrative for approaching the topic of illness, loss and physical and mental health. Hosted in the context of the Women’s Art Library (WAL), curator and lecturer Samantha Lippett will chair a debate, paying specific reference to Sarah’s latest Jonathan Cape published graphic memoir, A Puff of Smoke, that explores her experience of growing up with an undiagnosed rare disease and Lucy’s graphic novel Barking, that draws upon her experiences of mental illness following the loss of her father in her early twenties. Framed within the genre of graphic medicine, together they will consider the radical potential of books like these to discuss the life topics that are often too complex for words alone. Followed by a Q&A.

There will also be a temporary display of the books and associated ephemera that will later be donated to the Women’s Art Library archives. Both graphic novels will be available to buy and free drinks for all.

With thanks to special collections librarian, Althea Greenan.

FREE, booking recommended – please follow the link to book

A Puff of Smoke Talk and Workshop with author and artist Sarah Lippett

Date and Time: Fri, 22 November 2019, 13:30 – 14:30 GMT

Location: The Centre for Better Health, 1A Darnley Road, London, E9 6QH

FREE, but registration is required, please follow the link to register.

A Puff of Smoke (published by Jonathan Cape 7th November) is a graphic memoir about what it is like to grow up with an illness that no one can diagnose. Sarah Lippett spent eleven years suffering with symptoms from an unknown condition, until she was diagnosed with the rare disease Moyamoya at the age of 17.

 

For the month of November (1st – 29th November) an exhibition will be held at The Centre For Better Health that will explore the wider themes of the memoir.

Join Sarah as she talks through the process of revisiting her past and piecing it back together as a graphic memoir. The talk will be followed by a short workshop where participants are invited to create sequential narratives based on their own lived experiences. No drawing experience necesssary.

De-stress Project: GP prescriptions and referrals for depression in low income communities

Providing effective treatment and support for mental distress is a stated government aim. Within low-income communities, use of antidepressant medications is relatively high, but current strategies frame mental distress as an individual psychological problem, masking the factors that are often the root causes of suffering e.g. social isolation, unemployment.

De-STRESS project research aims to:

examine why and how people’s ability to cope with poverty-related issues has become increasingly pathologised

understand how high levels of antidepressant prescribing and use are impacting on people’s health and wellbeing in low-income communities

The lead author of the report is Dr Felicity Thomas, Senior Research Fellow on the Cultural Contexts of Health, and a Senior Research Fellow in the Medical School at the University of Exeter.

Transitional States: Hormones at the Crossroads of Art and Science

Team member Elena has been involved as an intern at the Peltz Gallery at the School of Arts at Birkbeck, where this exhibition opened today and runs until 11th June.

Here’s a short description:

What effect do hormone uses have on emotions, sensations, sexual expression and desire? This video art exhibition presents the work of 14 artists and collectives who explore the immense role hormones have on our everyday life.

For more info, visit the exhibition site or the Birkbeck blog

Image: Zaya Barroso, In Transito 2017

Grey Time: Waiting for Beckett, 22-23 May 2018, University of Oslo

Our Exeter PI, Laura will be giving a paper on waiting and ‘grey time’ in Beckett at the Grey on Grey Conference at the University of Oslo, 22-23 May 2018.

Abstract:

There is a well-known story that when Beckett got to see the colour footage of his television play Quad played back on a black and white monitor he insisted it was ‘marvellous, […] 100,000 years later’. Beckett went on to record a monochrome, slowed down version of the play, Quadrat II, to sit alongside alongside the surprisingly colourful, rhythmic jerks and swerves of Quadrat I; together these snapshots of life represent an asymptotic stretching of time, a shuffling on and off towards a final still state. This seems like a typical move from the Beckett who insisted on policing the greyscale of his drama. ‘Too much colour’, he told the actor Billie Whitelaw, over and over, as she rehearsed Footfalls. Grey, or ‘Light black. From pole to pole’, is of course everywhere in Beckett’s later work, but although there has been some significant research on Beckett’s relationship to and with colour, the grey so firmly associated with Beckett’s aesthetic – from the tableaux of the plays to his iconic personal
image — has less frequently been linked to the author’s particular interest in the temporality of waiting. This paper sets out to determine what might be meant by ‘grey time’ in Beckett’s work. It traces out a time that is resolutely not a twilight or the famous l’heure bleue stretch of gloaming between night and day; it is rather, I argue, a historically specific, postwar articulation of temporality in which waiting is denuded of its ‘for’ – its purpose, its project, its
‘colour’. By showing how and why certain aspects of grey time speak clearly to Beckett’s ashen historical period, I also want to suggest which parts of Beckett’s temporality remain, lingering and enduring within our current waiting times.

For full details on the conference, including a list of speakers and their abstracts, visit Gray on Gray at the UiO: Department of Philosophy, Classics, History of Art and and Ideas webpage.

CFP for the Accelerated Academy

The Accelerated Academy have issued a CFP for their upcoming conference on temporality in May this year.  Here are the details or visit their website.

Academic Timescapes: Perspectives, Reflections, Responsibilities
May 24-25, 2018, Villa Lanna, Prague, Czech Academy of Sciences

Keynote lecture: Barbara Adam (Cardiff)

After meetings in Prague, Warwick and Leiden, the fourth Accelerated Academy conference calls for a more nuanced perspective in order to advance our understanding of academic temporalities as experienced, understood, controlled, managed, imagined and contested across different institutional contexts. The question of temporality – the human perception and social organization of time – in and of the academy has been attracting considerable attention across the social sciences in recent decades. Notable accounts have demonstrated that time is an important research object potentially offering new insights into the complex and shifting nature of the contemporary academy and its future. Existing studies tend to stress how pressures intrinsic to the imperatives of the knowledge economy and academic/epistemic capitalism co-shape policies and subsequently impact how time is perceived and experienced on the level of individuals and institutions, leading to concerns over their temporal relation to wider society. Taking the cue from the long tradition of sociology of time the conference aims to tackle various pressing question in the emerging field of the social studies of academic time. The conference will address the following themes but the organizers welcome other cognate problematics:

  • Theorizations and different disciplinary takes on temporality in academia
  • (Possible) methods of inquiring into academic temporalities
  • Temporal design(s), temporal policies
  • Temporal justice vs/and temporal autonomy
  • The promises and limits of ‘the slow’ in academia
  • Temporalities in/of teaching; temporalities in/of research – tensions, complementarities, (in)compatibilities
  • Temporal interfaces with wider society and its implications for science communication
  • Temporality of science communication via social media
  • Digitalization, temporal intersections and emerging temporalities in academia
  • Temporality, metrics, evaluations

Please submit short abstract (250 words) and bio to vostal@flu.cas.cz by 28 February 2018.

Organized by Centre for Science, Technology, and Society Studies, Institute of Philosophy of the Czech Academy of Sciences & University of Minho, Research Centre on Communication Studies (CECS).

Funded by Czech Science Foundation, Czech Academy of Sciences (Strategie AV21) & Portuguese Science Foundation, CECS, University of Minho.

Scientific Committee: Emília Araújo (University of Minho), Jana Bacevic (Cambridge University), Libor Benda (Czech Academy of Sciences), Mark Carrigan (Cambridge University), Björn Hammarfelt (University of Borås), Milena Kremakova (Humboldt University), Sarah de Rijcke (Leiden University), Tereza Stöckelová (Czech Academy of Sciences), Tereza Virtová (Czech Academy of Sciences), Filip Vostal (Czech Academy of Sciences)