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Waiting is one of healthcare’s core experiences.  It is there in the time it takes to access services; through the days, weeks, months or years needed for diagnoses; in the time that treatment takes; and in the elongated time-frames of recovery, relapse, remission and dying.

Funded by the Wellcome Trust, our project opens up what it means to wait in and for healthcare by examining lived experiences, representations and histories of delayed and impeded time.

In an era in which time is lived at increasingly different and complex tempos, Waiting Times looks to understand both the difficulties and vital significance of waiting for practices of care.

Our work is divided across four themes.  Click on these for more information.

 

 

 

 

 

 

You can find out about all the work we are doing right here, including details of workshops, conferences, academic papers and publications and public engagement events.



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Lisa Baraitser on ‘Care, Hate, Gender: Revisiting the case of Harold Shipman’. The Roots of Misogyny, A Psychoanalytic Conference. Saturday 22nd January 2022

The Political Mind Presents: The Roots of Misogyny A Psychoanalytic ConferenceSaturday 22nd January 202210.00am – 4:30pm  These discussions will be delivered remotely via Zoom. Recording available* This is a psychoanalytic conference exploring developmental and psycho-social perspectives on misogyny. We will discuss the emergence of hatred and violent persecution of women, linking its origins in the crucible of the family with its manifestations …

Laura Salisbury’s talk “On Not Being Able to Read: Doomscrolling and Anxiety in Pandemic Times” January 11, 2022, 12:00 PM GMT

This talk analyses the phenomenon of ‘doomscrolling’ – the compulsive reading of anxiety-inducing online content – during the COVID-19 pandemic against the common idea that it is simply an addictive social practice that impedes mental flourishing. Instead, in order to open up its inclination towards care, I read doomscrolling through the anachronistic neologism that has …

Forms of Care shared reading list.

‘What forms does care take? What does taking care of oneself, another, or each other look and feel like?’ Members of the Waiting Times team recently joined scholars from critical medical humanities, disability studies, the environmental humanities, literary studies and feminist theory in response to the call to think about form as ‘that which might …

SHARE YOUR STORY

We’d love to hear your story of waiting.

It can be a written story, or a recording, or a video, or a picture.  Whatever you like.

 

 

Hit the big red ticket machine to upload your story, video, song, audio file, image or whatever you want to send.

 

 

Alternatively, you can email Michael (m.flexer@exeter.ac.uk) to share your story with us.

All stories will be anonymised and have identifying details removed.

Before sending us your story, please read our  Waiting Times Info Sheet  and download a Waiting Times Consent Form.