The Power of Sequential Narrative w/ Sarah Lippett and Lucy Sullivan

Saturday, 30 November, 3:30 – 6:30pm, Women’s Art Library (WAL), Goldsmiths University Library

Join graphic novelists Sarah Lippett and Lucy Sullivan for an afternoon of discussion on the power of sequential narrative for approaching the topic of illness, loss and physical and mental health. Hosted in the context of the Women’s Art Library (WAL), curator and lecturer Samantha Lippett will chair a debate, paying specific reference to Sarah’s latest Jonathan Cape published graphic memoir, A Puff of Smoke, that explores her experience of growing up with an undiagnosed rare disease and Lucy’s graphic novel Barking, that draws upon her experiences of mental illness following the loss of her father in her early twenties. Framed within the genre of graphic medicine, together they will consider the radical potential of books like these to discuss the life topics that are often too complex for words alone. Followed by a Q&A.

There will also be a temporary display of the books and associated ephemera that will later be donated to the Women’s Art Library archives. Both graphic novels will be available to buy and free drinks for all.

With thanks to special collections librarian, Althea Greenan.

FREE, booking recommended – please follow the link to book

A Puff of Smoke Talk and Workshop with author and artist Sarah Lippett

Date and Time: Fri, 22 November 2019, 13:30 – 14:30 GMT

Location: The Centre for Better Health, 1A Darnley Road, London, E9 6QH

FREE, but registration is required, please follow the link to register.

A Puff of Smoke (published by Jonathan Cape 7th November) is a graphic memoir about what it is like to grow up with an illness that no one can diagnose. Sarah Lippett spent eleven years suffering with symptoms from an unknown condition, until she was diagnosed with the rare disease Moyamoya at the age of 17.

 

For the month of November (1st – 29th November) an exhibition will be held at The Centre For Better Health that will explore the wider themes of the memoir.

Join Sarah as she talks through the process of revisiting her past and piecing it back together as a graphic memoir. The talk will be followed by a short workshop where participants are invited to create sequential narratives based on their own lived experiences. No drawing experience necesssary.

De-stress Project: GP prescriptions and referrals for depression in low income communities

Providing effective treatment and support for mental distress is a stated government aim. Within low-income communities, use of antidepressant medications is relatively high, but current strategies frame mental distress as an individual psychological problem, masking the factors that are often the root causes of suffering e.g. social isolation, unemployment.

De-STRESS project research aims to:

examine why and how people’s ability to cope with poverty-related issues has become increasingly pathologised

understand how high levels of antidepressant prescribing and use are impacting on people’s health and wellbeing in low-income communities

The lead author of the report is Dr Felicity Thomas, Senior Research Fellow on the Cultural Contexts of Health, and a Senior Research Fellow in the Medical School at the University of Exeter.

Waiting Times at NYPSI’s 1038th Scientific Programme Meeting:  Waiting for Psychoanalysis

This year we are honoured to be invited by New York Psychoanalytic Society &   Institute (NIPSI) to talk about “Waiting for Psychoanalysis”.
On Tuesday, 22 October, Lisa Baraitser, Jocelyn Catty, Raluca Soreanu, and Laura Salisbury,  (moderator) will talk on what it means to wait in and for healthcare to reflect on how psychoanalysis helps us to understand the difficulties and potentialities of waiting within contemporary lives that are increasingly experienced as frenetic, harried and time-starved, while also, paradoxically, impeded and stuck.
Psychoanalysis is a practice that takes and uses time self-consciously, working and thinking through rhythms that run counter to the values of immediacy, productivity and efficiency that orientate many of our experiences of contemporary life. By committing to the long timeline of psychoanalysis, the patient is brought into contact with something different: a demand for patience, for suffering and endurance in which processes of mourning, or the emergence and working through of traumatic memory, cannot be sped up but must be endured through time and ameliorated through a practice of endurance on the part of both patient and analyst.
This discussion will include academic researchers who also work clinically with patients in three different psychoanalytically-informed traditions to reflect on how psychoanalytic modes of care function through practices of waiting with – through the suspension of the everyday, the repetitions of the transference and processes of working through. They will discuss what this particular use of time might have to offer a social world in which, at one level, waiting seems increasingly devalued or intolerable, while at another the promises of a progressive future seem to be slipping from view – where all one can do it wait.

 

When: Tuesday, October 22, 2019, 8:00 – 10:00 pm

Where: New York Psychoanalytic Society & Institute, 247 East 82nd Street, NYC (btwn 2nd and 3rd Aves)

Register HEREvisit nypsi.org or call 212.879.6900 (New York, USA)