Parapraxis Conversations: On The Maternal. 9-10th July 2022

A Conversation on “The Maternal.” Part of a recurring lecture series centered on keywords in psychosocial thought.

Join The Psychosocial Foundation and Parapraxis for a conversation on “The Maternal” with Dr. Joy James, Dr. Lisa Baraitser, and Dr. Sarah Knott. Moderated by Dr. Hannah Zeavin.

Tickets are sliding-scale. Your contributions fund our continued work at The Psychosocial Foundation, including Parapraxis Magazine. To learn more about the whole series, click here. To learn more about Parapraxis , click here.

Date and time:

Sat, Jul 9, 2022, 6:00 PM –

Sun, Jul 10, 2022, 7:30 AM BST

Location:

Online event

Book Tickets 

Time for Emancipation: Poetry, Waiting, Repair. 26 May 2022

Symposium and workshop on the elusive concept of freedom, and exploring how we write about it. In-person.

When:
Venue: Birkbeck 43 Gordon Square

Book your place

Jenny Mitchell, award-winning writer and Artist in Association at Birkbeck Gender and Sexuality (BiGS), will facilitate a supportive 3-hour creative writing session in the morning of this day-long event, that looks at how we write about the elusive concept of freedom. What draws us to writing about freedom? What might it offer the writer and reader? Is it particularly important to think about freedom in a world so filled with subjugation, tyranny and chaos?

This is a participatory creative writing session and participants will be given examples of work by established poets to discuss; and prompts to stimulate their own writing.

This is followed by an afternoon symposium that explores questions of care and repair, reflecting on the waiting time between enslavement and emancipation from the perspective of Black British women. Jenny Mitchell offers new poems that retell the story of Jane Eyre from the perspective of a free 19th century woman of colour, questioning the role of servant or caregiver that women of colour are stereotypically forced to inhabit in relation to a dominant white culture that offers little care in return. Poets, historians and literary scholars will discuss the issues the poems raise – relations between Black and white women, freedom, and elongated modes of ‘waiting’, and poetry as a radical form of care and repair.

The symposium is a collaboration between Arts Week, Birkbeck Gender and Sexuality (BiGS), and Waiting Times, a Wellcome Trust funded research collaboration that is re-evaluating the relation between time and healthcare in the modern period. The symposium will be followed by a wine reception to celebrate Jenny Mitchell’s role as Artist-in-Association at BiGS, and her new collection of poems.

Participants can book for the whole day, or can attend just one session (either the poetry workshop or the symposium).      

Poetry workshop 10am – 1pm
Symposium 2pm – 5pm

Jenny Mitchell is an award-winning poet and workshop facilitator. Her second collection, Map of a Plantation, is winner of the Poetry Book Awards 2021. She won the Bedford International Poetry Prize 2021, the Ware Prize 2020, the Folklore and Aryamati Prizes, a Bread and Roses Award and several other competitions. A debut collection, Her Lost Language, is joint winner of the Geoff Stevens Memorial Poetry Prize and was voted One of 44 Books of 2019 (Poetry Wales). She is an Artist in Association at Birkbeck currently working on a pamphlet and third collection.

Roy McFarlane is a Poet, Playwright and former Youth & Community Worker born in Birmingham of Jamaican parentage, living in Brighton. He is the National Canal Laureate and has held the role of Birmingham Poet Laureate. His debut collection, Beginning With Your Last Breath, was followed by The Healing Next Time, (Nine Arches Press 2018) nominated for the Ted Hughes award and Jhalak Prize. His third collection Living by Troubled Waters is due out October 2022.  It includes a series of erasure poems drawing on narratives of the enslaved across the African diaspora, found in newspapers and posters in England and the Caribbean, post 1807.

Keith Jarrett is a writer, performer and educator whose work explores Caribbean British identity, religion and sexuality. Keith teaches at NYU London and is completing his debut novel.

S.I. Martin works with museums, archives and the education sector to bring diverse histories to wider audiences. He has published five books of historical fiction and non-fiction for adult and teenage readers.

Olivia Carpenter is Lecturer in Literature at the University of York. Her research focuses on Black Studies, Critical Race Theory and literary history. Her recent monograph on Black marriage in domestic fiction in the late 18th and early 19th century gives an account of how the politics of slavery and Abolition influenced the novel as a genre during the height of Abolition struggles in British courts, as well as Black resistance to slavery in both Britain and the colonies.

Lisa Baraitser is Professor of Psychosocial Theory in the Department of Psychosocial Studies, Birkbeck. She is the Co-Principal Investigator, with Laura Salisbury, of Waiting Times, a Wellcome Trust-funded collaborative award investigating the relation between time and care in the modern period. She has written widely on motherhood, psychoanalysis, time and care.

Kelechi Anucha
Kelechi is PhD candidate on the Wellcome-funded Waiting Times project. She is an associate member of the Wellcome Centre for Cultures and Environments of Health at University of Exeter and a member of the Black Health and Humanities Network. Her project examines time and care in contemporary end-of-life narratives, exploring the relationship between untimeliness, literary form and the politics of health.

https://waitingtimes.exeter.ac.uk/team-time/

https://wcceh.org/meet-the-team/phd-students/kelechi-anucha/

https://www.blackhealthandhumanities.org/people/

About

This event takes place in-person at Birkbeck’s School of Arts, as part of Arts Week 2022.  https://www.bbk.ac.uk/annual-events/arts-week/arts-week/arts-week-2022

Communication about this event will be sent from messenger@bbk.ac.uk. Do check your Spam/Junk/Other inbox if you are looking for emails from this address.

Laura Salisbury talk at “Trans Healthcare: Past, Present & What Might Have Been” seminar. 26 Apr 2022

Part of a broader project on Trans Healthcare and Creativity, this event will explore the past, present and ‘what might have been’ of trans healthcare provision in the UK. What is trans healthcare now, what has it been, and what could it be?

Join us for a roundtable discussion with contributions from speakers from a range of disciplines and practices, including:

Ellis J. Johnson (he/him) is a psychodynamic psychotherapeutic counsellor, supervisor, trainer, consultant and group facilitator, working mainly alongside transgender, non-binary, queer or questioning people. As a transgender man of mixed-heritage, Ellis is passionate about attending to the intersections of race, class, and coloniality in his work; he holds a particular interest in decolonising our understandings of gender, sexuality and spirituality. He delivers training in trans inclusion and anti-racist practice to organisations and therapists across the UK and internationally.

Stephen Whittle OBE is Professor of Equalities Law at Manchester Metropolitan University. In 1992, Stephen was a co-founder of Press for Change (PFC), the UK’s trans rights lobby group. PFC’s very successful campaigns have resulted in several major case law successes at the European Court of Justice and the European Court of Human Rights, which have led to significant legal changes since the mid-1990s, including the Gender Recognition Act 2004, and full protection under the Equality Act 2010. Stephen has advised on transgender rights and law to the UK, Scottish, Irish, Italian, Japanese, Hong Kong, and South African governments, as well as the European Union & the Commission, and the Council of Europe. He regularly advises lawyers and writes briefs, or is an expert witness, for courts worldwide. He has authored many academic papers, non-academic articles, several books and writes a regular blog.

Krishna Istha is a London-based screenwriter, comedian, performance artist and theatre maker. They make socially conscious, form-pushing works about taboo or underrepresented experiences of gender, race and sexual politics. Currently, they are writing on Sex Education (Netflix), is a Barbican Centre Open Lab artist (2022), and is part of the writing team at Die Gute Fabrik (a Copenhagen-based games studio). More recently, they co-directed Jazz and Dice by Naked Productions for BBC Radio 4, was an Arts Admin Bursary Artist (2020-21), and came Runner-Up on Screenshot (a competition for comedy writer-performers hosted by Sister Pictures and South of the River Pictures).

Laura Salisbury is a Professor in Medicine and English Literature at the University of Exeter. She has research and teaching interests in modernist, postmodernist and contemporary fiction; medical humanities; philosophies of temporality, ethics and affect; psychoanalysis; neuroscience and language. With Lisa Baraitser (Birkbeck) she is joint PI on a Wellcome Trust Collaborative Award called ‘Waiting Times’ (2017-2022), a project working to uncover what it means to wait in and for healthcare. She is currently writing a cultural history of waiting in modernity.

Ruth Pearce is a trans health activist and Lecturer in Community Development at the University of Glasgow. Her work explores issues of inequality, marginalisation, power, and transformative political struggle from a trans feminist perspective. She has conducted research on trans health services in the UK, international alternatives to traditional gender clinics, and trans people’s experiences of pregnancy and childbirth. She is the author of “Understanding Trans Health”, plus co-editor of “The Emergence of Trans” and “TERF Wars”. Ruth also plays bass in noise-pop band wormboys, shouts a lot in queer punk trio Dispute Settlement Mechanism, and blogs at http://ruthpearce.net.

This event is accompanied by a writing workshop for trans, non-binary and GNC writers on Friday 29 April, led by Juliet Jacques: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/trans-healthcare-creativity-writing-workshop-with-juliet-jacques-tickets-316626738097

Trans Healthcare and Creativity is funded by the University of Manchester. Our aim is to contribute to current conversations about trans healthcare provision in the UK whilst advocating for the role of creativity in imagining future models of care. Our second event will take place on Tuesday 7th June, on the theme of ‘Possible Futures’. To contact us, email: transhealthcareandcreativity@gmail.com.

18:00-20:00 26 Apr 2022

The event is FREE. Please register via Eventbrite. https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/trans-healthcare-creativity-past-present-what-might-have-been-tickets-316783436787

Laura Salisbury’s talk “On Not Being Able to Read: Doomscrolling and Anxiety in Pandemic Times” January 11, 2022, 12:00 PM GMT

This talk analyses the phenomenon of ‘doomscrolling’ – the compulsive reading of anxiety-inducing online content – during the COVID-19 pandemic against the common idea that it is simply an addictive social practice that impedes mental flourishing. Instead, in order to open up its inclination towards care, I read doomscrolling through the anachronistic neologism that has come to define this textual practice. My talk reads the anxious textuality of Don DeLillo’s The Silence and Saidiya Hartman’s reworking of W. E. B. Du Bois’s ‘The Comet’ to demonstrate how doomscrolling emerges from a moment in which trust is anxiously fractured, but how it works, nevertheless, to witness what gets to count within a time felt to be coming to an end.

11th January 2022 

12pm GMT

Zoom Link: https://iitgn-ac-in.zoom.us/j/93379454169

Meeting ID: 933 7945 4169
Passcode: 052495

More details here.

 

 

Forms of Care shared reading list.

‘What forms does care take? What does taking care of oneself, another, or each other look and feel like?’ Members of the Waiting Times team recently joined scholars from critical medical humanities, disability studies, the environmental humanities, literary studies and feminist theory in response to the call to think about form as ‘that which might productively organise but also capture the protean nature of care’. These books, articles and projects are a selection of the work engaged in presentations and discussions across the workshop. They are shared here as a resource for others and to mark the event which took place online on the 9th and 10th September. The forms of care workshop was organised by Dr Erin Lafford (Oxford) and Dr Alexandra Kingston-Reese (York) courtesy of the University of York.

Details of individual presentations can be found below the reading list.

 

Forms for care conference – reading list selection:

Burke, L. (2014). Oneself as another: Intersubjectivity and ethics in Alzheimer’s illness narratives. Narrative Inquiry, 4(2), 28-47.

Butler, J. (2021) The Force of Nonviolence: An Ethico-Political Bind. Verso.

Fuchs, E (2005) Making an Exit: A Mother-Daughter Drama with Alzeheimer’s, Machine Tools, and Laughter. Metropolitan: New York.

Harney, Stefano, and Fred Moten. The Undercommons: Fugitive Planning & Black Study (2013) New York: Minor Compositions

Hedva, Johanna. (2015) ‘My Body Is a Prison of Pain so I Want to Leave It Like a Mystic But I Also Love It & Want It to Matter Politically.’ Lecture, Human Resources, Los Angeles, October 7.

Jacoby, O. (1919/2019) Words in Pain: Letters on Life and Death. Ed. by J. Catty and T. Moore. Oxford: Skyscraper Publications.

Karjevsky G., Talevi, R., Bailer, S., (eds) (2020) Letters to Joan Tronto. With Edna Bonhomme, Johanna Bruckner, Teresa Dillon, Joao Florencio, Johanna Hedva, Elke Krasny, Patricia reed, Yayra Sumah and Joan Tronto. New Alphabet School.

Kittay, E. F. (2003) The Subject of Care: Feminist Perspectives on Dependency (Feminist Constructions). Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.

Stengers, I., (2011) The Care of the Possible: Isabelle Stengers interviewed by Erik Bordeleau, Landscape, Architecture, Political Economy, (1): 12-17.

Schaffer, Talia (2021) Communities of Care: The Social Ethics of Victorian Fiction. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press.

The Care Collective (2020) Andreas Chatzidakis, Jamie Hakim, Jo Littler, Catherine Rottenberg, and Lynne Segal. The Care Manifesto: the Politics of Interdependence. London: Verso.

The Mind’s Eye (2021) Care Syllabus. MCLA. https://www.caresyllabus.org/about

Mol, Annemarie, Ingunn Moser, and Jeannette Pols (2010) ‘Care: Putting Practice into Theory’, in Care in Practice: On Tinkering in Clinics, Homes and Farms, ed. by Annemarie Mol, Ingunn Moser, and Jeannette Pols (Verlag, Bielefeld: transcript).

Out of the Woods Collective (2020) Hope Against Hope: Writings on Ecological Crisis. Brooklyn, NY: Common Notions.

Whitehead, Anne. (2017) Medicine and Empathy in Contemporary British Fiction: An Intervention in Medical Humanities. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.

 

 

Programme:

Elizabeth Barry, ‘We Hang Up Laughing: Dementia, Care and the Temporality of Laughter’

Marie Allitt, ‘Stratifying Care: Geology and Grammar of Cancer and Hospital Care in Peter Reading’s C

Lucy Burke, ‘Taking time: Reading Ali Smith’s There But For I as a form of care’

Alice Hall, ‘Caring and Curating: Women, Work and the Carers UK Archive’

Zoe Weinberg, Jade Colon, Amira F. Hassan, and Savanna Schaefer, ‘The Free Form of Freewriting as a Form of Care’

Elisabeth Pedersen, ‘The Catholic Worker Care Model: Building Interdependent Caring Communities and Kinships’

Lisa Baraitser and Stephanie Davies, ‘Waiting as Care’s Form: Notes from the Waiting Times Project’

Michael Flexer, ‘Signs You Care: Form in the Semiotic of Caring’

Jocelyn Catty and Laura Sailsbury, ‘Writing into the Future: Letters as Containers of Time and Care’

Jordan Osserman, ‘The ‘Object’ of the Puberty Blocker’

Kelechi Anucha, ‘Form and Fugitive Care’

Nicola Kirkby, ‘Care and Repair: Narrative Infrastructure in Elizabeth Gaskell’s Ruth (1853)’

David James, ‘Pathographic Close Reading’

Levi Prombaum, ‘A No Manifesto for Caring in Cultural Interpretation’

Victoria Papa, ‘Caremaking: Beyond Give & Take’ 

Laura Thompson, ‘Museological Critiques and Accessibility’

 

Stephanie Davies

Forms of Care: An Interdisciplinary Workshop. 9-10th September. A two-day interdisciplinary workshop exploring care and its form(s) at the intersection of ethics, affect, and aesthetics.

Thu, Sep 9, 2021, 11:30 AM –

Fri, Sep 10, 2021, 3:30 PM BST

organised by  Alexandra Kingston-Reese and Erin Lafford

Continue reading “Forms of Care: An Interdisciplinary Workshop. 9-10th September. A two-day interdisciplinary workshop exploring care and its form(s) at the intersection of ethics, affect, and aesthetics.”

International Conference: Fiction in the Age of Globalization, 22 July 2021 9.15 am – 6.10 pm (CET)

On Thursday 22 July 2021  12-1 pm (CET)/11 am-12 pm (UK) Professor Laura Salisbury will give a keynote paper “On Not Being Able to Read: Doomscrolling and Anxiety in Pandemic Times” at the International Conference: Fiction in the Age of Globalization (Universität Tübingen, Germany, online)

For information and program click here.

For (free) registration and the Zoom link please get in touch at arya.aryan@uni-tuebingen.de

24 July, 2:00 pm – 25 July, 5:00 pm. Psychoanalysis for the People: Free Clinics and the Social Mission of Psychoanalysis Conference

*Discount tickets are available for Essex students and staff. For them, the conference cost is £25 for the whole event. You can access the ticket by going to the conference page, clicking the ‘Book Now’ button, then clicking ‘enter promo code’ in the new window. Then enter the code ‘People25‘, without quotations marks, which brings up the new ticket option.

PART 2: DIVERSITY OF PRACTICES

In 1918 Freud placed the free clinic at the heart of psychoanalytic thought and practice, and predicted that out-patient clinics would be started where treatment would be free.

His speech resonated with many psychoanalysts of his time, who were invested in the social mission of psychoanalysis and who were the authors of significant institutional innovations, setting up free and low-cost clinics in Vienna, Berlin and Budapest.

This conference starts from the premise that the more recent progressive histories of psychoanalysis remain little known among therapeutic practitioners. They are rarely written about in the professional literature or taught on trainings. Yet there is a rich tradition of psychoanalytic theory and practice which engages with the realities of social inequality based on class, gender, poverty, racism, and other forms of marginalisation. We aim to explore and recognise these socially-minded psychoanalytic practices, drawing on the experience of psychoanalysts working in free and low cost clinics in very different contexts, from Latin America, Africa, North America and Europe, through to the UK National Health Service. We ask what “psychoanalysis for the people” might mean in our times, more than 100 years after Freud’s famous speech.

Speakers: Joanna Ryan, Lisa Baraitser, Raluca Soreanu, Barry Watt, Geraldine Ryan, Christine Diercks, Daniel Gaztambide, Peter Nevins, Graham Music, Martin Moore, Emiliano de Camargo David

Keynote lecture: Tales Ab’Sáber (A Social Clinic as an Immanent Development of Psychoanalytic Theory: The Open Psychoanalysis Clinic)

This is the second of two conferences exploring socially engaged psychoanalytic practice. The first part took place on 16th and 17th January 2021 

Organised by: Raluca Soreanu & Joanna Ryan

Supported by: The Waiting Times Project (Wellcome Trust, PIs Lisa Baraitser and Laura Salisbury) and Balint Groups Project (Wellcome Trust, PI Raluca Soreanu).

Visit the Freud Museum to book tickets and see the full conference programme and abstracts.

 

9th July. Narrating Evidence. The second in a series of seminars about the uses and meanings of evidence in contemporary health contexts and beyond.

Can literary and oral narratives work as forms of evidence? What do they tell us that more objective, statistical or quantitative forms of data cannot? Lara Choksey and Kelichi Anucha discuss the interplay between literary narrative and health contexts.

Lara Choksey is postdoctoral fellow in the Wellcome Centre for Cultures and Environments of Health, University of Exeter working on a project which brings literary and cultural studies approaches to questions of heredity and environment in the ‘postgenomic’ era. Her monograph, Narrative in the Age of the Genome: Genetic Worlds (Bloomsbury), is out in February 2021.

Kelichi Anucha is a PhD candidate working on the relationship between time and care in end of life narratives, as part of the Wellcome Trust-funded research project Waiting Times. Her current project focuses on contemporary end-of-life literature and visual cultures, paying particular attention to representations of impeded, disrupted and alternate temporalities.

Fri, 9 July 2021

14:00 – 15:30 BST

Online. Book tickets here.

This event is part of Following the Evidence, a series of online seminar discussions about the uses and meanings of evidence in contemporary health contexts and beyond.  Hosted by the Index of Evidence project, Wellcome Centre for Cultures and Environments of Health, each session focusses on a particular type of interaction with evidence, and the kinds of things we do with it: narrating it, waiting for it, and perhaps increasingly, doubting it. More details at: indexofevidence.org/events


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