Care and Waiting: Marion Coutts in Conversation with Laura Salisbury. Tuesday 29th of June

Artist and writer Marion Coutts is best known for her award-winning memoir The Iceberg, written in response to her husband’s diagnosis and eventual death from a brain tumour. In this online event, Marion speaks to Laura Salisbury, Professor of Modern Literature and Medical Humanities at the University of Exeter, about healthcare, waiting times and contemporary art, writing and thinking.

Find out more, including how to access the event livestream, on the Critical Poetics website.

This event is one in a series of free to attend, public events as part of the 2021 Critical Poetics Summer Schoolprogramme:

Friday 25 June — Care in the Time of COVID: Michael Rosen in Conversation
Monday 28 JuneCare for the Stranded: Astrida Neimanis
Tuesday 29 JuneCare and Waiting: Marion Coutts in Conversation with Laura Salisbury
Wednesday 30 JuneInter-species Care: Maya Chowdhry and Mama D Ujuaje in Conversation with Eva Giraud
Thursday 1 JulyTroubling Care: Nat Raha, Bhanu Kapil and Raymond Antrobus
Friday 2 JulyFreedom and Care: Maggie Nelson in Conversation with Seán Hewitt

Organised by the Critical Poetics Research Group at Nottingham Trent University (NTU) in partnership with Nottingham Contemporary and Curated & Created at NTU.

For more details and to register click here.

Dialogues on the time of Covid-19 Summer Series. Thursday 24th of June. Boredom – deprivations and emptiness in the pandemic.

Josh Cohen, psychoanalyst, Professor of Modern Literary Theory and author of “Not Working: Why We Have to Stop” and other books, will be in conversation with Laura Salisbury, Professor in Modern Literature and Medical Humanities, whose wide ranging publications include a book on Beckett and papers on waiting and who is working on the cultural history of waiting in modernity. The dialogue will be chaired by Trudy McGuinness, psychoanalyst.

June 24th, 2021 8:15 PM through  9:45 PM

Location
Remote Event, delivered via Zoom
London
United Kingdom
Contact
Standard Ticket £ 25.00
Concession Ticket £ 15.00

For more details and to register, click here.

Researching the Unconscious: The Essex Summer School in Psychosocial and Psychoanalytic Research Methods 04, 18, 25 June 2021

 

 

This summer school brings together experienced psychosocial researchers, who will teach you how they use psychosocial and psychoanalytic ideas and methodologies to conduct their research. Based on examples from their own research practice, you will learn how psychosocial approaches and psychoanalysis can help you construct your object of research, conduct your fieldwork, and interpret your findings.

In the inaugural lecture of the summer school, Prof Lisa Baraitser will discuss collaboration as a psychosocial method. She will address questions of research methods from the perspective of collaboration and the impossibility of working alone. Offering a psychosocial perspective on interdisciplinarity, she will show how we are dependent on others for making new knowledge, a process that is not necessarily harmonious, and can be full of archaic terrors that are played out and reworked as the research unfolds.

The four sessions of the course will be dedicated to interview methods, discourse analysis, psychosocial ethnography, and ethnographic reflexivity. Prof Sasha Roseneil’s session will be dedicated to the biographical-narrative interpretive method (BNIM) as psychosocial research method. Prof Jason Glynos will discuss discourse and fantasy, showing how the concept of fantasy can be ‘operationalised’ for purposes of critical empirical research. Dr Raluca Soreanu’s will discuss psychosocial ethnography, showing how to approach difficult research sites and how to ‘listen’ to psychosocial scenes. Dr Ruth Sheldon’s session will be dedicated to ethnography and its forms of reflexivity.

For more information and to register click here. 

24 July, 2:00 pm – 25 July, 5:00 pm. Psychoanalysis for the People: Free Clinics and the Social Mission of Psychoanalysis Conference

PART 2: DIVERSITY OF PRACTICES

In 1918 Freud placed the free clinic at the heart of psychoanalytic thought and practice, and predicted that out-patient clinics would be started where treatment would be free.

His speech resonated with many psychoanalysts of his time, who were invested in the social mission of psychoanalysis and who were the authors of significant institutional innovations, setting up free and low-cost clinics in Vienna, Berlin and Budapest.

This conference starts from the premise that the more recent progressive histories of psychoanalysis remain little known among therapeutic practitioners. They are rarely written about in the professional literature or taught on trainings. Yet there is a rich tradition of psychoanalytic theory and practice which engages with the realities of social inequality based on class, gender, poverty, racism, and other forms of marginalisation. We aim to explore and recognise these socially-minded psychoanalytic practices, drawing on the experience of psychoanalysts working in free and low cost clinics in very different contexts, from Latin America, Africa, North America and Europe, through to the UK National Health Service. We ask what “psychoanalysis for the people” might mean in our times, more than 100 years after Freud’s famous speech.

Speakers: Joanna Ryan, Lisa Baraitser, Raluca Soreanu, Barry Watt, Geraldine Ryan, Christine Diercks, Daniel Gaztambide, Peter Nevins, Graham Music, Martin Moore, Emiliano de Camargo David

Keynote lecture: Tales Ab’Sáber (A Social Clinic as an Immanent Development of Psychoanalytic Theory: The Open Psychoanalysis Clinic)

This is the second of two conferences exploring socially engaged psychoanalytic practice. The first part took place on 16th and 17th January 2021 

Organised by: Raluca Soreanu & Joanna Ryan

Supported by: The Waiting Times Project (Wellcome Trust, PIs Lisa Baraitser and Laura Salisbury) and Balint Groups Project (Wellcome Trust, PI Raluca Soreanu).

Visit the Freud Museum to book tickets and see the full conference programme and abstracts.

 

The Power of Sequential Narrative w/ Sarah Lippett and Lucy Sullivan

Saturday, 30 November, 3:30 – 6:30pm, Women’s Art Library (WAL), Goldsmiths University Library

Join graphic novelists Sarah Lippett and Lucy Sullivan for an afternoon of discussion on the power of sequential narrative for approaching the topic of illness, loss and physical and mental health. Hosted in the context of the Women’s Art Library (WAL), curator and lecturer Samantha Lippett will chair a debate, paying specific reference to Sarah’s latest Jonathan Cape published graphic memoir, A Puff of Smoke, that explores her experience of growing up with an undiagnosed rare disease and Lucy’s graphic novel Barking, that draws upon her experiences of mental illness following the loss of her father in her early twenties. Framed within the genre of graphic medicine, together they will consider the radical potential of books like these to discuss the life topics that are often too complex for words alone. Followed by a Q&A.

There will also be a temporary display of the books and associated ephemera that will later be donated to the Women’s Art Library archives. Both graphic novels will be available to buy and free drinks for all.

With thanks to special collections librarian, Althea Greenan.

FREE, booking recommended – please follow the link to book

A Puff of Smoke Talk and Workshop with author and artist Sarah Lippett

Date and Time: Fri, 22 November 2019, 13:30 – 14:30 GMT

Location: The Centre for Better Health, 1A Darnley Road, London, E9 6QH

FREE, but registration is required, please follow the link to register.

A Puff of Smoke (published by Jonathan Cape 7th November) is a graphic memoir about what it is like to grow up with an illness that no one can diagnose. Sarah Lippett spent eleven years suffering with symptoms from an unknown condition, until she was diagnosed with the rare disease Moyamoya at the age of 17.

 

For the month of November (1st – 29th November) an exhibition will be held at The Centre For Better Health that will explore the wider themes of the memoir.

Join Sarah as she talks through the process of revisiting her past and piecing it back together as a graphic memoir. The talk will be followed by a short workshop where participants are invited to create sequential narratives based on their own lived experiences. No drawing experience necesssary.

De-stress Project: GP prescriptions and referrals for depression in low income communities

Providing effective treatment and support for mental distress is a stated government aim. Within low-income communities, use of antidepressant medications is relatively high, but current strategies frame mental distress as an individual psychological problem, masking the factors that are often the root causes of suffering e.g. social isolation, unemployment.

De-STRESS project research aims to:

examine why and how people’s ability to cope with poverty-related issues has become increasingly pathologised

understand how high levels of antidepressant prescribing and use are impacting on people’s health and wellbeing in low-income communities

The lead author of the report is Dr Felicity Thomas, Senior Research Fellow on the Cultural Contexts of Health, and a Senior Research Fellow in the Medical School at the University of Exeter.

Transitional States: Hormones at the Crossroads of Art and Science

Team member Elena has been involved as an intern at the Peltz Gallery at the School of Arts at Birkbeck, where this exhibition opened today and runs until 11th June.

Here’s a short description:

What effect do hormone uses have on emotions, sensations, sexual expression and desire? This video art exhibition presents the work of 14 artists and collectives who explore the immense role hormones have on our everyday life.

For more info, visit the exhibition site or the Birkbeck blog

Image: Zaya Barroso, In Transito 2017

Grey Time: Waiting for Beckett, 22-23 May 2018, University of Oslo

Our Exeter PI, Laura will be giving a paper on waiting and ‘grey time’ in Beckett at the Grey on Grey Conference at the University of Oslo, 22-23 May 2018.

Abstract:

There is a well-known story that when Beckett got to see the colour footage of his television play Quad played back on a black and white monitor he insisted it was ‘marvellous, […] 100,000 years later’. Beckett went on to record a monochrome, slowed down version of the play, Quadrat II, to sit alongside alongside the surprisingly colourful, rhythmic jerks and swerves of Quadrat I; together these snapshots of life represent an asymptotic stretching of time, a shuffling on and off towards a final still state. This seems like a typical move from the Beckett who insisted on policing the greyscale of his drama. ‘Too much colour’, he told the actor Billie Whitelaw, over and over, as she rehearsed Footfalls. Grey, or ‘Light black. From pole to pole’, is of course everywhere in Beckett’s later work, but although there has been some significant research on Beckett’s relationship to and with colour, the grey so firmly associated with Beckett’s aesthetic – from the tableaux of the plays to his iconic personal
image — has less frequently been linked to the author’s particular interest in the temporality of waiting. This paper sets out to determine what might be meant by ‘grey time’ in Beckett’s work. It traces out a time that is resolutely not a twilight or the famous l’heure bleue stretch of gloaming between night and day; it is rather, I argue, a historically specific, postwar articulation of temporality in which waiting is denuded of its ‘for’ – its purpose, its project, its
‘colour’. By showing how and why certain aspects of grey time speak clearly to Beckett’s ashen historical period, I also want to suggest which parts of Beckett’s temporality remain, lingering and enduring within our current waiting times.

For full details on the conference, including a list of speakers and their abstracts, visit Gray on Gray at the UiO: Department of Philosophy, Classics, History of Art and and Ideas webpage.